Three Most Underrated Superfoods

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My Healthy Recipes For Weight Loss: Brussels Sprouts with Lemon Parmesan

Lemon Parm Brussells Sprouts This delicious and nutritious version of Brussels Sprouts is sure to make anyone a fan. If you are working out regularly and looking to lose weight, you know how important fiber is to your diet. Please try this awesome side dish today:

Wash , half and prep 1 lb Brussels Sprouts- Let dry in colander.- Saute 1 chopped onion in butter until browned – Add Brussels Sprouts – Cook for 7-8 minutes – Add 1 t. ground dried rosemary – Add 2 garlic cloves minced – Saute 1 minute – Remove from heat -Add juice of 2-3 fresh lemons and 1/2 c. fresh grated Parmesan cheese – Add salt and pepper to taste. – Serve and eat! Serve this recipe with my Roasted Chicken W/ Garlic, Lemon and Herbs

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My Healthy Recipes For Weight Loss: Roasted Organic Chicken w/ Garlic, Lemon & Herbs

Roasted Chicken with Garlic and Lemons Here is a simple and delicious chicken dish to make any time:

Wash and pat dry two 4 lb chickens
Coarsely chop two carrots, 2 stalks of celery and two onions. Add to bottom of roasting pan
Place chickens in pan. Drizzle 2 T.olive oil over chickens.
Squeeze the juice of 4 lemons over chickens and place lemon halves inside chickens.
Peel one head of garlic and split the whole cloves between the two chickens and place inside each chicken. Mince a few gloves and smear on each chicken.
Sprinkle 1 t. of salt over each chicken along with 1/2 t. of dried rosemary, thyme and black pepper over each chicken.
Place into preheated oven at 475. Turn heat down to 400 degrees and cook birds for 1.5 hours or until done.

Let sit 15 minutes before serving. Serve with my Brussels Sprouts w/ Lemon Parmesan

#thrivefitnessandwellness #fitnessfood #comfortfood #healthyeating

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Milk: What Dairy May Be Doing to Our Bodies

Milk products

Before I begin this article I simply want to point out a few facts regarding the human consumption of milk:

1) First off. Humans are the only animal to drink the milk of another species. No other animal consumes the milk of another species except humans.

2) Human beings are the only animal that drinks milk beyond the weening period. In other words, we drink milk way beyond the point where it’s needed. Milk is after all, breast milk or liquefied food designed to provide all the nutrients an infant needs until such a time that it can chew and ingest solid foods. We are essentially drinking and consuming  cows breast milk.

The consumption of dairy – specifically cow’s milk products, has been a much debated topic among some community, and more and more people are aware of the health impact that dairy may have on their bodies.

Cow’s milk products have protein molecules that, when leaked through our intestinal wall without being fully digested – as in the case of leaky gut syndrome – can cause our immune system to react leading to immediate symptoms such as hive, wheezing and vomiting, or longer term issues such as loose stool, abdominal cramps, and skin rash.

Some people – especially most African Americans, Asians and Native Americans – stop producing adequate amount of lactase to digest lactose (the sugar found in milk) after they have weaned off mother’s milk. The undigested lactase can cause symptoms of lactose intolerance, which can include bloating, cramps, pains, gas, vomiting or diarrhea.

Dairy has been found to promote the production of mucus in our bodies, resulting in symptoms of congestion. Some people who have suffered from sinus issues for their entire life have their sinus cleared just by cutting out dairy from their diets.

Hormones and antibiotics are often used in commercial farming to promote milk production and to prevent infection in crowded conditions. These substances may lurk in the final milk products, affecting our health and in particular, the balance of our endocrine system.

Although dairy contains a good amount of calcium, it may not be the best way to maintain bone health if other factors are considered. In fact, Studies show that countries with the highest milk consumption also have the highest osteoporosis rates.  Dairy causes blood pH to become acidic. When the body needs to balance blood pH, it will draw calcium from the bones, reducing bone density. Additionally, calcium in dairy may not be the most bio-available – meaning that the body may not be able to utilize the entire ingested amount. In upcoming posts/newsletters, I will talk about how you can ensure adequate calcium intake without having to depend on dairy products.

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Eating Better: The Five Habits Cheat Sheet

healthier eating Habits

Research says it takes twenty-one days to implement a new habit. It seems very hard to focus on only one habit at a time. When you start to dwell on all of the bad habits you want to change into good habits it can get very overwhelming.

Sometime over the next day or so, take twenty minutes out of your day and create a list of habits you want to add in or take out of your life. Prioritize them. Work on one habit at a time.

Throughout our time together, it is my hope that you will form healthier eating habits that enable you to make better food choices. Below is a list of five questions that will help you create better eating habits.

  1. When did you last eat? If it’s been longer then 2–4 hours, it’s time to eat, so that you don’t overeat when you finally get the chance to eat.
  2. Where is the complete protein? Does your meal include a 3–4 oz. portion of protein? If not, find a lean protein source such as lean meat, fish, or a combination of grain and legume.
  3. Where are the veggies (preferably green ones)? Does your meal or snack include at least a cup raw or half a cup of cooked vegetables? Have them steamed or stir fried preferably, but make sure you have at least five servings per day.
  4. Where are the carbs? If you have fat to lose, make sure that the carbs you are choosing are high-fiber, low-sugar carbs. Choose beans or lentils instead of bread, rice, pasta or potatoes.
  5. Where are your fats coming from? Get your fats from mono-unsaturated sources such as olive oil, olives, avocado, and even chia or flaxseeds. You need to have a modest amount of fat throughout your day. They are essential for your health and also help to keep you feeling satisfied.

Behavioral Habit Goals:

Create a list of three behavioral goals you will implement over the course of the next six weeks. Focus each goal on one behavior you need to either extinguish or add into your life.

  1. __________________________________________________________________
  2. __________________________________________________________________
  3. __________________________________________________________________
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6 Simple Ways Nutrition Helps Regulate Mood

food-choices

In keeping with the theme of food and mood, here is a great list of helpful ways to regulate that mood!

#1. Eat regularly: Food is fuel; skip a meal and you’ll feel tired and cranky. Don’t get yourself into a state of hypoglycemia – which is the #1 trigger for mood issues.

#2. Don’t skimp on carbs: Carbohydrates have long been demonized, but your body needs carbs to produce serotonin—a feel-good brain chemical that elevates mood, suppresses appetite, and has a calming effect.

Only complex carbs—high in fiber and packed with whole grains—have a positive effect on mood, whereas simple carbs such as candy, cake, cookies, and other sugary choices, bring you down. Need a quick mood boost? Try an all-carb snack, like a couple cups of air-popped popcorn or half a whole-grain English muffin.

#3. Get enough omega-3 fatty acids: Omega-3s—found in fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, and sardines—improve both memory and mood. Most experts recommend at least two servings of fatty fish per week; other sources include ground flax-seeds  walnuts, canola oil, and omega-3-fortified eggs.

#4. Get enough of these nutrients: iron, vitamin B1, B6, folic acid, selenium, and vitamin D.

#5. Watch your fat intake: Greasy choices—particularly those high in saturated fat—are linked to both depression and dementia.

#6. Moderate your caffeine intake: In moderate amounts, caffeine can enhance physical and mental performance, but too much can spur anxiety, nervousness, and mood swings. Stick to one or two cups daily to dodge the negative effects.

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Mood Swings – Nutritionally Related Trigger #2 – Gluten Intolerance

-headache

Gluten intolerance can trigger mood swings, depression and anxiety.

People who are gluten intolerant can suffer from mood problems, depression and anxiety when they eat foods that contain gluten. In children, this can also be expressed as learning disabilities or behavioral issues such as hyperactivity. Gluten can damage the brain and nerves of gluten-sensitive people. The symptoms from gluten occur through its action on the nervous system and affect brain function.

Gluten intolerance often express itself as chronic bowel problems especially constipation, and cravings for gluten-containing foods such as refined sweets and starches.

The best way to find out if you are gluten intolerant is to eliminate gluten from the diet and challenge after 2 weeks – meaning adding gluten-containing foods back into the diet and observe the reaction.

Here are some gluten-free grains that you can explore: brown rice, buckwheat, amaranth,cornmeal (polenta), millet, quinoa, wild rice and oats/oatmeal (sometimes oats can contain gluten due to content, contact or contamination during the manufacturing process).

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Mood Swings – Nutritionally Related Trigger #1 – Hypoglycemia

Mood swings

Hypoglycemia – a fancy name for low blood sugar level. Hypoglycemia occurs when:

  • Your body’s sugar (glucose) is used up too quickly
  • Glucose is released into the bloodstream too slowly
  • Too much insulin is released into the bloodstream

Although it is most common in people with diabetes, it can happen for healthy people from time to time as well, especially when there is big fluctuation in blood sugar level, or if a person hasn’t eating for a long period of time.

Skipping meals, not eating enough during meal, genetic tendency for low blood sugar and not compensating by adding extra meals or snacks can all contribute to hypoglycemia.

There are a few ways to alleviate mood issues caused by hypoglycemia:

  • Eat meals that are low in glycemic load: substitute refined grains with whole grains,include a generous amount of vegetables, and a moderate amount of protein and good fats which can slow down the absorption of carbs.
  • To keep blood sugar level even, experiment with having 5 – 6 small meals or snacks a day, instead of 3 big meals.
  • Avoid as much as possible processed foods, and anything that contains sugar and refined carbohydrates.

If you need extra help with balancing blood sugar level, there are a few things that you can take to supplement your nutritional intake The basics are:

  • Good multivitamin to deal with backlog of deficiencies
  • Vitamin C
  • Essential fatty acid – fish oil supplement, omega 3
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The Right Snack Track

Snacking is the downfall of many otherwise healthy diets, but the good news is that you can learn to control this snacking quite easily. Even if still want to snack during the day, there are ways in which you can do so without killing your healthy diet. Staying on track with your diet when you like to snack might be hard, but it is worth that extra effort to keep your body healthy. To prevent mindless  over-snacking, simply eat more meals. Instead of eating three large meals every day, try eating smaller meals every few hours. If you are snacking because you are hungry, chances are that you are using more energy than you are ingesting and you need the extra fuel. By eating 6 smaller but healthy meals every day, you will not be tempted to snack as often, but will keep your high energy levels.

You can also help to stop your snacking simply by removing temptation. Before you reach for a snack, ask yourself if you are honestly hungry or if you are just eating because you are bored, because the food tastes good, or because you feel compelled to eat while doing a certain activity (like watching a movie). If you are snacking because you are really hungry, than it is probably fine to have something to eat, but if you are snacking for another reason, you should try to remove the temptation. Simply rid your house of junk foods and do not buy these items again when you go to the grocery store.

Purchase healthy snacks if you can and curb eating between meals. Think about the snacks you are eating. Would they fit easily into a food group as fruit, vegetable, grain, dairy, or protein? If the answer is no, then the snack is probably not good for you. For example, carrot sticks (vegetables), yogurt (dairy), or whole wheat crackers (grains) work well as snacks, while candy, potato chips, and processed foods do not.

When you snack, remember to consider your beverages as well. Drinks like soda, fruit punch, iced tea, lemonade, and juice boxes can contain unnatural ingredients and lots of sugar. In short, they are high in calories but low in nutrients. Instead, opt for drinks that supplement your healthy diet. Choose water most of the time, or drinks that are made with natural fruits, like real fruit smoothies. Low-fat milk and some low sugar, chemical free  sports drinks are also good choices. Above all, stay away from most kinds of alcohol. Red wine is an exception, since this can help your heart health, but any type of alcohol in high amounts is fairly bad for your body.

For more articles go to http://thrivefitnessandwellness.lifestyleezine.com

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